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The sabellid, Bispira volutacornis
79,90 € *
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Bispira volutacornis, a sabellid polychaete, is an epibenthic filterfeeder. Its conspicuous appearance makes it a notable member of the marine hardbottom communities around Ireland and Britain. Bispira volutacornis is credited with having a key role in certain hard bottom communities. The literature on Bispira volutacornis prior to this study was restricted almost exclusively to faunal records and descriptions of the external morphology, with knowledge of its biology and ecology being very fragmentary and this paucity of information prompted the current study. This study investigates different aspects of its biology and ecology in Lettercallow Bay, on the West Coast of Ireland, including: Examining the structure and functioning of the branchial crown, Investigating aspects of tube construction and role, Monitoring the reproductive cycle, and investigating the association with Gastrodelphys clausii. The result is a highly illustrated book which provides an insight into the world of featherduster worms and thus is of interest to both the general naturalist and those looking to gain further specialised knowledge.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 21.02.2020
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Modeling and Simulations of Active Worms
49,00 € *
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Active worms propagate across networks by employing various target discovery techniques. The significance of target discovery techniques in shaping a worm s propagation characteristics is derived from the life cycle of the worm. Various target discovery techniques that could be employed by active worms are discussed and compared. It is anticipated that future active worms would employ multiple target discovery techniques simultaneously to greatly accelerate their propagation. To accelerate a worm s propagation, the slow start phase in the worm s propagation must be shortened by letting the worm infect the first certain percentage of susceptible hosts as soon as possible. Strategies that future active worms might employ to shorten the slow start phase in their propagation are studied. Their respective cost-effectiveness is assessed. A novel active defense mechanism which can effectively defend against the propagation of active worms is proposed.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 21.02.2020
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Fish Parasites Part II
71,90 € *
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Monogenean parasites of freshwater fish could be considered as one of the most prevalent diseases affecting skin and gills, which included irritation, severe destruction of the gills, impaired breathing as well as severe losses too. They are the most abundant ectoprasitic flukes of fish, with greater diversity of species occurring in tropics than in the temperate regions of the world. They spend their entire life cycle as parasites on gills and skin of fish, hold to the fish by the use of hooks and attachment organs at the posterior end.This study investigates the prevalence of these parasites infecting some of the economically important fresh water fish from the River Nile at Qena province, Egypt. This is followed by detailed description by means of light microscopy of the recorded parasite species including a detailed description of the different parts of the recovered worms.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 21.02.2020
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Eel life history
34,00 € *
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The eel is a long, thin bony fish of the order Anguilliformes. Because fishermen never caught anything they recognized as young eels, the life cycle of the eel was a mystery for a very long period of scientific history. Although there have been more than 6500 publications about eels, much of its life history remains an enigma. The European eel was the one most familiar to Western scientists, beginning with Aristotle who did the first known research on eels. He stated that they are born of earth worms, which emerged from the mud with no fertilization needed they grew from the guts of wet soil. For a long time, nobody could prove Aristotle wrong. Later scientists believed that the eelpout Zoarces viviparus was the Mother of Eels. In 1777, the Italian Carlo Mondini found the creature's gonads and proved that eels are fish. In 1876, the young Austrian student Sigmund Freud dissected hundreds of eels in search for the male sex organs. He had to concede failure in his first published research paper, and turned to other issues in frustration

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 21.02.2020
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Insect Biodiversity and Integrated Pest Managem...
35,90 € *
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Moringa is one of the most popular vegetable crops of India and is being cultivated on a commercial scale in recent years. Insect pests are one of the major factors limiting the production of moringa. The crop is mainly damaged by defoliators, bud worms and sucking pests. This book consists of chapters on biology, life cycle, seasonal occurrence of various insect pests, integrated pest management strategies for moringa pests, biodiversity of insect pests and natural enemies in moringa ecosystem and effect of weather factors on entomofauna of moringa. The information provided in this book will be helpful in formulating better pest management strategies for effective management moringa pests and to improve the yield.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 21.02.2020
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The Vertebrate Integument Volume 2
156,00 CHF *
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The emphasis in this volume is on the structure and functional design of the integument. The book starts with a brief introduction to some basic principles of physics (mechanics) including Newton’s Three Laws of Motion. These principles are subsequently used to interpret the problems animals encounter in motion. It is in only the last 40 or so years that we have begun to understand how important a role the integument plays in the locomotion of many marine vertebrates.  This involves the crossed-fiber architecture, which was first discovered in a classic study on nemertean worms. As a design principle we see that the crossed-fiber architecture is ubiquitous in nature. Research on some of the most dynamic marine vertebrates of the oceans – tuna, dolphins and sharks, and the extinct Jurassic ichthyosaurs – shows precisely how the crossed-fiber architecture contributes to high-speed swimming  and (in lamnid sharks) may even aid in energy conservation.  However, this design principle is not restricted to animals in the marine biota but is also found as far afield as the dinosaurs and, most recently, has been revealed as a major part of the microstructure of the most complex derivative of the integument, the feather. We see that a variety of phylogenetically diverse vertebrates take to the air by using skin flaps to glide from tree to tree or to the ground, and present detailed descriptions of innovations developed in pursuit of improved gliding capabilities in both extinct and modern day gliders. But the vertebrate integument had even greater things in store, namely true or flapping flight. Pterosaurs were the first vertebrates to use the integument as a membrane in true flapping flight and these interesting extinct animals are discussed on the basis of past and cutting-edge research , most intriguingly with respect to the structure of the flight membrane. Bats, the only mammals that fly, also employ integumental flight membranes. Classic research on bat flight is reviewed and supplemented with the latest research, which shows the complexities of the wing beat cycle to be significantly different from that of birds, as revealed by particle image velocimetry. The book’s largest chapter is devoted to birds, given that they make up nearly half of the over 22,000 species of tetrapods. The flight apparatus of birds is unique in nature and is described in great detail, with innovative research highlighting the complexity of the flight structures, bird flight patterns, and behavior in a variety of species. This is complimented by new research on the brains of birds, which shows that they are more complex than previously thought. The feather made bird flight possible, and was itself made possible by β-keratin, contributing to what may be a unique biomechanical microstructure in nature, a topic discussed in some depth. A highly polarized subject concerns the origin of birds and of the feather. Alleged fossilized protofeathers (primal simple feathers) are considered on the basis of histological and taphonomic investigative studies in Chapter 6. Finally, in Chapter 7 we discuss the controversies associated with this field of research. Professor Theagarten Lingham-Soliar works at the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth and is an Honorary Professor of Life Sciences at the University of KwaZulu-Natal.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 21.02.2020
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Tapeworms, Lice, and Prions
27,90 CHF *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

An extraordinary array of infectious agents affects humans; from worms, arthopods, and fungi to bacteria, viruses, and prions. In this compendium of the curious and fascinating organisms that cause disease, including Legionnaire's disease, mumps, CJD, and chlamydia, David I. Grove provides a lively, fact-filled account of the nature of each organism, their life cycle, the ingenious ways in which they infect humans, and the human stories behind their discovery.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 21.02.2020
Zum Angebot
Tapeworms, Lice, and Prions
27,90 CHF *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

An extraordinary array of infectious agents affects humans; from worms, arthopods, and fungi to bacteria, viruses, and prions. In this compendium of the curious and fascinating organisms that cause disease, including Legionnaire's disease, mumps, CJD, and chlamydia, David I. Grove provides a lively, fact-filled account of the nature of each organism, their life cycle, the ingenious ways in which they infect humans, and the human stories behind their discovery.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 21.02.2020
Zum Angebot
The Vertebrate Integument Volume 2
135,99 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

The emphasis in this volume is on the structure and functional design of the integument. The book starts with a brief introduction to some basic principles of physics (mechanics) including Newton’s Three Laws of Motion. These principles are subsequently used to interpret the problems animals encounter in motion. It is in only the last 40 or so years that we have begun to understand how important a role the integument plays in the locomotion of many marine vertebrates.  This involves the crossed-fiber architecture, which was first discovered in a classic study on nemertean worms. As a design principle we see that the crossed-fiber architecture is ubiquitous in nature. Research on some of the most dynamic marine vertebrates of the oceans – tuna, dolphins and sharks, and the extinct Jurassic ichthyosaurs – shows precisely how the crossed-fiber architecture contributes to high-speed swimming  and (in lamnid sharks) may even aid in energy conservation.  However, this design principle is not restricted to animals in the marine biota but is also found as far afield as the dinosaurs and, most recently, has been revealed as a major part of the microstructure of the most complex derivative of the integument, the feather. We see that a variety of phylogenetically diverse vertebrates take to the air by using skin flaps to glide from tree to tree or to the ground, and present detailed descriptions of innovations developed in pursuit of improved gliding capabilities in both extinct and modern day gliders. But the vertebrate integument had even greater things in store, namely true or flapping flight. Pterosaurs were the first vertebrates to use the integument as a membrane in true flapping flight and these interesting extinct animals are discussed on the basis of past and cutting-edge research , most intriguingly with respect to the structure of the flight membrane. Bats, the only mammals that fly, also employ integumental flight membranes. Classic research on bat flight is reviewed and supplemented with the latest research, which shows the complexities of the wing beat cycle to be significantly different from that of birds, as revealed by particle image velocimetry. The book’s largest chapter is devoted to birds, given that they make up nearly half of the over 22,000 species of tetrapods. The flight apparatus of birds is unique in nature and is described in great detail, with innovative research highlighting the complexity of the flight structures, bird flight patterns, and behavior in a variety of species. This is complimented by new research on the brains of birds, which shows that they are more complex than previously thought. The feather made bird flight possible, and was itself made possible by β-keratin, contributing to what may be a unique biomechanical microstructure in nature, a topic discussed in some depth. A highly polarized subject concerns the origin of birds and of the feather. Alleged fossilized protofeathers (primal simple feathers) are considered on the basis of histological and taphonomic investigative studies in Chapter 6. Finally, in Chapter 7 we discuss the controversies associated with this field of research. Professor Theagarten Lingham-Soliar works at the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth and is an Honorary Professor of Life Sciences at the University of KwaZulu-Natal.

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 21.02.2020
Zum Angebot